High Power Rifle (Across the Course)

High Power Rifle is one of the most popular forms of rifle competition in the United States. Matches are multi-position, multi-distance events. (This is commonly called "Across the Course" competition to distinguish it from prone-only and other High Power matches.) NRA and CMP competition are very similar with minor rule differences. Most typically, High Power competition means iron sights (both NRA and CMP now allow low power optics in Service Rifle classes), three positions (standing, prone, and sitting OR kneeling), with both rapid-fire and slow-fire stages. This form of competition evolved from the U.S. Military's qualification courses of fire.

Rules

NRA Sanctioned matches are governed by NRA High Power Rifle Rules. Club matches are generally run by NRA rules, sometimes with minor variations.

Service Rifle and Match Rifle classes are combined. M1 Garand class with 5 or more shooters. "Any sight" with 5 or more shooters.

NRA classifications are used and may be combined up. Master classes will not be combined.

Course of Fire

100 yard reduced course, targets used simulate full distance targets.

National Match Course (50 shot)

  1. Slow Fire, standing - 10 rounds at 200 yards in 10 minutes. SR-1
  2. Rapid Fire, sitting or kneeling - 10 rounds at 200 yards in 60 seconds. SR-1
  3. Rapid Fire, 10 rounds prone - 300 yards in 70 seconds. SR-21
  4. Slow Fire, 20 rounds prone - 600 yards in 20 minutes. MR-31

Regional Match Course (80 shot)

  1. Slow Fire, standing - 20 rounds at 200 yards in 20 minutes. SR-1
  2. Rapid Fire, sitting or kneeling - 10 rounds at 200 yards in 60 seconds, two times. SR-1
  3. Rapid Fire, 10 rounds prone - 300 yards in 70 seconds, two times. SR-21
  4. Slow Fire, 20 rounds prone - 600 yards in 20 minutes. MR-31

For "Slow Fire" the shooter takes his/her position on the firing line, assumes the standing or prone position and is allowed one minute per shot to fire the string. One round is loaded at a time.

"Rapid Fire" is more involved. In rapid fire sitting or kneeling and prone, the shooter uses a preparation period to establish position; when the command to commence fire is given, the shooter loads either 2 or 5 rounds (depending on the firearm) into the rifle, fires the rounds in the rifle, reloads with 8 or 5 more for a total of 10 and finishes the string. The procedure for rapid fire sitting and prone differ only in the firing position and the time allowed.

Required Equipment

  • Rifle (Service, Match, Garand or Any Rifle/Any Sight)
  • 2 or more magazines
  • Empty chamber indicator (available at matches)

Optional Equipment

  • Sling (Strongly recommended)
  • Spotting Scope
  • Shooting Coat
  • Shooting Glove (Work glove is better than none)
  • Shooting Mat (A carpet remnant or camping pad works)
  • Shooter's Stool
  • Log Book

Contact

Sid Berg
mastersid223@gmail.com
707-839-5453

Gary Krietsch
Gary.Krietsch@humboldt.edu
707-825-8546